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How to Find Right Livelihood

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Occasionally I like to cross-pollinate here from my other, more stealth Buddhist blog, The Liberated Life Project.

I thought that you — my Jizo peeps — might enjoy knowing that I’m offering an e-course in October through the LLP called “Fall in Love with Your Work.” This is a month-long adventure into the heart of ‘right livelihood’ and how you can make it happen in your life.

If you are considering making a shift in your professional life, starting to work for yourself or starting a business, or if you need to re-align your relationship with your current job so that it feels more meaningful, “Fall in Love with Your Work” may be right up your alley

You can find out more on this page. Registration closes this Saturday, September 29, and the course starts on October 1. I hope that some of you will join me for this!

palms together,

Maia

The Dharma and the Border

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Early this morning, I wrote this post for the Upaya Zen Center website. I wanted to share it here as well because it is such a wonderful illustration of socially engaged dharma and because in the past I have written on immigration issues on this blog. I was very moved by all the speakers, and particularly by two of them who shared that they were Buddhist or had practiced Buddhism. The dharma is deep and subtle, and knows no boundaries.

Last night, the deep quiet of the Upaya Zen Center temple embraced 20 visitors who started their journey a week earlier in Tijuana, Mexico. The Caravan for Peace and Justice with Dignity is comprised of men and women who have lost loved ones to the “drug war” waged by the United States since the 1970s.

Poet Javier Sicilia is at the heart of this band of pilgrims, leading them on a one-month journey across the U.S. to share their stories and to help Americans understand that our fate is entwined with theirs… in other words, to shine a light on our shared responsibility and karma in this war that has no winners and that has created so much suffering.

More than 100 people in the zendo listened with great attentiveness and compassion as members of the Caravan spoke about sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, who had been killed or disappeared in the course of this war. Sicilia’s son, whom he made clear did not use drugs, became a victim of drug war violence and his beaten and asphyxiated body was found, along with six of his friends, in a car along a highway in the state of Morelos in 2011.

The visit coincided with the last evening of Upaya’s Buddhist Chaplaincy Program summer intensive training period. Roshi Joan Halifax and Sensei Fleet Maull welcomed the guests, along with Upaya’s head monk, Shinzan Palma, originally from Mexico himself. Fleet, who had himself been a drug trafficker in his youth and spent 14 years in a federal prison on those charges, gave the group his unconditional support and recognized the responsibility that we all shared in this situation.

The group from the Caravan was clearly moved by the deep listening and support from the audience. At the end of the evening, we all chanted the four bodhisattva vows together, as Roshi reminded us that we were offering the chant in this case to these bodhisattvas from Mexico.

The Caravan will spend two more days in Santa Fe and then head to El Paso, TX, on August 20. Their final destination is Washington, DC, which they plan to reach on September 10. You can learn more about the Caravan here: http://www.globalexchange.org/mexico/caravan/

Mindfulness for Military Vets

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Maxine Hong Kingston, author of “The Woman Warrior”

On a day when the New York Times headline story is  “Suicides Outpacing War Deaths for Troops,” I wanted to call your attention to some good work going on with returning combat veterans.

To be clear — I want to see the day when military action becomes entirely replaced by skillful and persistent diplomatic efforts, and when the U.S. as a whole (government and citizens) is able to look deeply at the root causes and conditions of war and understand our place in that karma. Until that day comes, we have vets coming home who are wounded physically and emotionally.

Here are a few contemplative and mindfulness-based initiatives that I’m aware of that are serving this community (one of which is time-sensitive, with a retreat coming up this July). If you know of more, please share them in the comments below.

  • “The Coming Home Project” is a non-profit organization founded by Dr. Joseph Bobrow, Roshi, a Zen teacher. The project, begun in 2006, is devoted to providing expert, compassionate care, support, education, and stress management tools for Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, service members, their families, and their service providers. Visit their website to find out more about their services.
  • The Buddhist Military Sangha is a nonpolitical and nonsectarian forum for Buddhists serving in the US Armed Forces. This website includes quite an extensive collection of links on pastoral care, mental health, and re-entry/readjustment websites.

Occupy Wall Street: Buddhist Voices

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10:00 pm update: Please make sure to read the comments underneath this post — I’ve added a few more article and videos. Also please see the Calendar of Events.

The movement to Occupy Wall Street (OWS) has been building for the past month. Until just recently, there were very few Buddhists writing on the subject.

Over the past week, I’ve come across a number of essays and statements on OWS coming from Buddhist voices. I’m sharing and summarizing the ones I’ve found below – if you have more to add to this list, please write in the comment section.

Some of these will be featured in next week’s Upaya Zen Center e-newsletter, which always includes fascinating and provocative articles from the dharma world (and beyond).

• Chris Wilson, president of the Buddhist Peace Fellowship board of directors, compares OWS to the Arab Spring and states that BPF endorses OWS  “based on our agreement that the influence of money in politics is blocking many of the social justice and environmental goals that BPF promotes. It is also based on the fact that Occupy Wall Street has made nonviolence one of its primary commitments and thus far has kept that commitment.”

Read more here: http://bpf.org/what-buddhists-are-saying/occupy-and-arab-spring

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• In “We Are the 100%,” Ari Pliskin of the Zen Peacemakers offers a “mindful response” to OWS. Drawing on the precepts and particularly this one: “When peacemakers vow to be oneness, there is no Other,” Ari’s piece makes the case for a non-dualistic view of the current situation.

Read more here: http://www.elephantjournal.com/2011/10/we-are-the-100/

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• Madrone Phoenix, a dharma practitioner based in Providence, RI, shares her experience visiting OWS in New York last week, and she reflects on her earlier experiences as an “angry activist” and how her Buddhist practice over the past few years has impacted her way of being involved in this movement. She writes, “i woke up to the notion that to occupy a place – to infuse it with kindness, consideration and deep love for all – is the place where liberation truly occurs whether in our minds, or in our streets.”

Read more here: http://cultivatefearlessness.blogspot.com/2011/10/waking-up-from-american-dream.html

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• Michael Stone, a yoga and meditation teacher based in Toronto, also visited NYC last week. He offers his perspective in an article titled, “Remaining Human: A Buddhist Perspective on Occupy Wall Street.” In it, he focuses on the ways in which this nascent movement is striving to be the change it wishes to see, through a commitment to nonviolence and a collective decision making process. Michael writes, “We need a language now that allows us to reimagine what a flourishing society looks like. Any meditator knows that there are times when the thoughts that stream endlessly through awareness can eventually grow quiet. But it’s only temporary. The stories come back. But they return differently. They have more space and they are –more fluid, less rigid. We need stories to think and make sense of a world – now an ailing world that needs us.”

Read more here: http://torontobodymind.ca/articles/remaining-human-buddhist-perspective-occupy-wall-street

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• Rev. Zenju Earthlyn Marselean Manuel, past executive director of the Buddhist Peace Fellowship and Zen priest based in the San Francisco Bay Area, notes the troublesome connotations of the word, “occupy.” She writes, “The word brought up visions of invasion, people marching in to take over.  I also saw a consciousness of us holding down specific territories (turfing) that seems to persist as the way to conquer.”

Read more here: http://zenjuearthlynmanuel.com/2011/10/09/un-occupy-the-land/#more-1451

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• The Rev. James Ford, who has the distinction of being both a Unitarian Universalist minister and a Zen priest, begins his piece by echoing the words of Harvey Milk: “I’m here to recruit you.” Rev. Ford’s lengthy meditation, which he originally delivered as a sermon, weaves together themes from the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur (a day of atonement) with political and economic analysis, but his main point is clear: get involved. He writes, “Sometimes you have to be outside. Sometimes you have to stand up. And sometimes you have to shout. You have to make demands that may be uncomfortable to the status quo. The Vietnam war ended for many reasons, but one principal among them were the people willing to mass together, take some tear gas, and bear witness to another way.”

Read more here: http://monkeymindonline.blogspot.com/2011/10/american-autumn-yom-kippur-meditation.html

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